Deciding to what I need #skywatcher


Focdarthvaderxi@...
 

I have a few electronic kits at the house that came with a mixture of arduino kits, and I have a arduino mega. I am trying to figure out if it would be easier to order a kit, although I'm unsure which one I would need, or see if I have the parts to make build an onstep with what I have. My questions are:
what does it take to make the mega into an onstep? 
What is the recommended kit for an orion telescope xt6?


Khalid Baheyeldin
 

On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 06:40 PM, <Focdarthvaderxi@...> wrote:
what does it take to make the mega into an onstep? 
You need a RAMPS v1.4 or v1.5 shield, and two StepStick stepper driver at a minimum.
But the Arduino Mega2560 is the weakest platform for OnStep. Its clock is not accurate
and the microcontroller is the slowest.

So you are better of with a kit.

If cost is an important factor, then the lowest cost kits are the CNC v3 or the MKS Gen-L v2.1.

What is the recommended kit for an orion telescope xt6?
Any OnStep board can run almost any mount, not matter what size.
What is different is which motors will be used, and what current requirements they
have. Based on that, you decide on stepper drivers, which are usually in the StepStick
form factor. Certain boards will have recommended driver models over others.


 

On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 05:40 PM, <Focdarthvaderxi@...> wrote:

What is the recommended kit for an orion telescope xt6?
I am in the minority here as most users like the faster controllers such as the Fystec S6.  However, the MKS v2.0 or 2.1 is an easy board to assemble (and cheap).  Yes, the processor is on the slower side, but I don't need 4deg/sec slew rates.  I find that with the economical (and quiet/cool) high current TMC2209 drivers, my GEM EQ5 slews plenty fast even at 32 microsteps.  I had inadvertently set it at 8 microsteps when I first assembled the OnStep controller, and it was very fast to slew.  For an XT6 dob, if you used 16 microsteps, I think you would be happy in how quickly the scope would slew to the target.

For you, the mechanics of modifying the dob base might be a much bigger effort than the electronics.  There are some examples of an XT8 or XT10 in the Wiki Showcase, so the principle for an XT6 should be the same.


Khalid Baheyeldin
 

To the original poster: the MKS Gen-L is far superior to an Arduino Mega2560, because the former has an accurate clock, while the latter does not.

If you don't mind slow slewing (which depends on your overall gear reduction), then the MKS Gen-L V2.1 is a great cost-effective solution, specially with the low cost TMC2209 (who also have limitations, but they are irrelevant in certain cases).