WebServer on Wemos D1 R32


Jamie Flinn
 

New thread as the Wemos/CNC 3 combination is now up and stable under both bluetooth and wifi connections - However despite scouring the config and being able to connect via wifi for operation I cannot get the web-app to be reachable - always ERR_CONNECTION_REFUSED

Using OnStepX for this test as it appears to install the webserver components - but maybe I am missing something - since this is NOT a wemos D1 mini (which I have installed successfully before) it looks like all the server code is part of the OnStep code

So my question is:  is there a specialized process under 4.24 or Onstep X to properly set up the webserver - I have set OPERATIONAL_MODE and WEB_SERVER under WifiManager but nothing works (so I know I am missing something)

If you have your webapp running on the Wemos D1 R32/ CNC 3 combo can yo list your steps and settings you need to do this....I am so close I can taste it!!!!!

Thanks...J


kevin
 

so if you aren't using a wemos D1 mini , what are you running the smartwebserver on? it is a separate processor under 4.24 on a separate serial port. will it run on on the main Wemos D1 R32 under OnstepX?


Jamie Flinn
 

That is what I am wondering (and why I am checking out the wemos D1 R32) - My understanding is that this unit has built in BT and Wifi capability - I am intending OnStep x for this and not 4.24 - since on my GenL units I needed Wemos Di mini for wifi operations is seem like a winner, but if I have to also add another device then is it  no better off than My GenL and S6 (which can fully handle TMC5160 SPI - no soldering needed) - its all play time anyway - if anyone know if the server can run under ONStepX on this unit would love to know


 

What you're refering to in OnStepX it not a web server. It's only WiFi command channel (telnet server) for connecting wSHC, android App or ascom driver and it can work either WiFi or BT, not both of them at the same time. There is no way you can implement SmartWebServer without separate wifi coprocessor either ESP32 or ESP8266.


Ken Hunter
 
Edited

My understanding is that the Wemos D1 R32 uses an ESP32 core mcu and that only the BT is used by OnStep. 
It is reported that the BT and WiFi are not able to play well together on the ESP32 and that a separate WiFi MCU
is required to have both operational at the same time.

I have taken to using Velcro to attach the WiFi module to the bottom of the D1 R32 and hard wiring the
+5, Gnd, TX and RX to the Wemos module. Check the WiKi page for the connections.

Edit: Actually connecting the Wifi module to the Barrel connector (+12V and Gnd)


Jamie Flinn
 

Thanks all...that answers the question...will dig out my wemos di mini and load it up...btw the wifi control was solid and nice to not need another cable


Ken Hunter
 

I should probably add that connecting the WiFI module to the Barrel connector will keep it from working
if powering the Wemos from the USB. In that case, connect the Wifi to the Wemos 5V output but double
check the voltage. Some reports of the various Wemos boards having flaky regulators and low voltage
outputs.


kevin
 

Hi Ken,
Which WIFI module do you use like that?
My WeMos D1 Mini ESP8266 has a  me6211 regulator that is specified as absolute max input voltage of 6.5V  and the input pin is labelled 5V.


Drew 🔭📷🚴‍♂️
 

On Wed, Jan 19, 2022 at 12:51 PM, kevin wrote:
My WeMos D1 Mini ESP8266 has a  me6211 regulator that is specified as absolute max input voltage of 6.5V  and the input pin is labelled 5V.
This "Wemos ESP8266 cannot tolerate 5 volts" seems to be causing some confusion. The Wemos ESP8266 D1 mini/pro modules we use have an onboard 5V to 3.3V regulator as you stated. Those specs look correct.

The caveat is that the ESP8266 cannot tolerate 5V on the input(GPIO) pins. The warning was put there because Encoders have both 3.3V and 5V signal outputs.

So the upshot from this is don't confuse input(GPIO) pin and power input pin specs, they are different beasts. However don't put 5V on the 3.3V power pin, bad things can and will  happen.


kevin
 

True i agree the I/O is only 3.3v which is why i am concerned by my Wemos D1 R32 board circuit. The D1 mini has a USB CH340  chip set to run from the regulated 3.3v and so have 3.3v signals into the ESP but my Wemos D1 R32 board's CH340 is set to 5V operation so it is over driving various pins on the ESP.
  Ken was saying he runs his WIFI module off the barrel connect for power, which is often specified for up to 18V, but i don't know what he is using. Running linear regulators like mine a lot above their minimum dropout is a bit of  a problem because the get hot with the power dissipated and self protect by shutting down ( unless they just blow) and this leads to intermittent temperature dependant problems that are difficult to diagnose.


Drew 🔭📷🚴‍♂️
 

True i agree the I/O is only 3.3v which is why i am concerned by my Wemos D1 R32 board circuit. The D1 mini has a USB CH340  chip set to run from the regulated 3.3v and so have 3.3v signals into the ESP but my Wemos D1 R32 board's CH340 is set to 5V operation so it is over driving various pins on the ESP.

You are worried over details that have no basis in fact. There are probably thousands of these boards out there.


Here is the reason this is acceptable in this one particular case:

In the example schematic, the CH340 is powered directly from the USB bus. The problem here is that the CH340C output logic levels are referenced to VCC input. Therefore, we have the TX and RX pins working at 5V instead of 3.3V.
Under normal circumstances, directly connecting the TX and RX lines to ESP32 or ESP8266 will kill the ESP chips because they are not supposed to work with 5V UART devices.
However, in this case the CH340C pin output current is limited to 3mA only and the input logic-high threshold is low enough to allow the ESP to use 3.3V CMOS logic levels on the UART pins.

This is the reason for connecting a 5V UART system directly to the ESP32 in the ESP32 CH340 programmer schematic. The clamping diodes on the ESP IOs can handle 3mA as per the datasheet.