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New build. Can I use a HiLetgo STM32F407VET6?


Mechotronic
 

Hello everyone, I'm new and looking to build my first setup. I'm adapting a dob with some 100:1 motors and a bunch of 3d printed parts. After digging around it looks like 32bit has a lot of advantages and I'd like to go that route. I was wondering if the controller here: https://www.amazon.com/HiLetgo-STM32F407VET6-Cortex-M4-Development-NRF2410/dp/B071KBZR58 is a good fit? I'm just wondering if there are any gotchas to using this. I already have one sitting around so it would be easy to use, but I'm not dead set on it. Thanks!


Khalid Baheyeldin
 

On Mon, Nov 23, 2020 at 01:00 PM, Mechotronic wrote:
I'm new and looking to build my first setup. I'm adapting a dob with some 100:1 motors and a bunch of 3d printed parts. After digging around it looks like 32bit has a lot of advantages and I'd like to go that route. I was wondering if the controller here: https://www.amazon.com/HiLetgo-STM32F407VET6-Cortex-M4-Development-NRF2410/dp/B071KBZR58 is a good fit? I'm just wondering if there are any gotchas to using this. I already have one sitting around so it would be easy to use, but I'm not dead set on it.
If you go that route, then you are on your own. You have to create a HAL file for that board, and also a pinmap.

What I recommend is that you use something that has already been developed, debugged, and tested instead.
The MKS Gen-L (cheap but slow) and the FYSETC S6 (faster, for a bit more money) provide all the features of
OnStep in ready soldered boards. The R32 + CNCv3 is very cheap and still fast enough. It lacks heaters though
if you ever want them. The OnStep purpose built boards require ordering parts (or kits) and soldering everything
together, but offer a broader selection of drivers.

So there is already a wide variety of solutions. No need to create another one that has no clear advantage.


Mechotronic
 

Thanks for the response. I should have been clear with my previous post in that I'm comfortable with embedded development and don't mind getting my hands dirty. I did some more searching and it looks like the F4 is working okay for some people in various forms. I have piles of microcontrollers that I need to use up. The extra I/O would be nice too because I will probably tinker quite a bit with it.  

Are you referring to the ESP32 Uno style boards when you mention the R32? Those look pretty neat. I may look into those since they're $10 if F4 fights me too much. I would get the F6 in a snap if it wasn't going to take until the end of December to ship to me.


Mike Ahner
 

On Mon, Nov 23, 2020 at 01:47 PM, Mechotronic wrote:
I would get the F6 in a snap
That is FYSTEC S6, not F6

-Mike


Khalid Baheyeldin
 

On Mon, Nov 23, 2020 at 02:47 PM, Mechotronic wrote:
Thanks for the response. I should have been clear with my previous post in that I'm comfortable with embedded development and don't mind getting my hands dirty. I did some more searching and it looks like the F4 is working okay for some people in various forms. I have piles of microcontrollers that I need to use up. The extra I/O would be nice too because I will probably tinker quite a bit with it.  
Yes, they have a working HAL in the STM32duino board manager.

But what I meant is: a HAL specific to OnStep, not the STM32duino HAL.

The F4s we use, and already have a HAL for each, is the STM32F446 and STM32F411.
Each uses different timers, and different digitalWrite macros for fast toggling.

See it all here.

You will need to create all that for the F407 board.

We also have pinmaps for specific boards that use the F411 and F446. You will need to
create a daughter board or shield to plug the F407 into, then wire everything up, and
test it.

It is all possible, just more work, and no one else uses what you are building.

Are you referring to the ESP32 Uno style boards when you mention the R32? Those look pretty neat. I may look into those since they're $10 if F4 fights me too much.
Yes, this is the R32/CNCv3 page.
Cheap and easy to put together.

I would get the F6 in a snap if it wasn't going to take until the end of December to ship to me.
Not the EFF six, rather the ESS six.


Mechotronic
 

Yeah, I meant the S6. I can only really get them from Ali and it would be a month. I went ahead and ordered the r32. I will still look into porting the 407 just because I'm curious about it. Prototyping and wiring and all that don't bother me since I do that all the time. I saw the OnStep HAL and see what your going for. I was looking into the datasheets to see how much of a difference it would be. Thanks for the help.


Khalid Baheyeldin
 

On Mon, Nov 23, 2020 at 03:09 PM, Mechotronic wrote:
Prototyping and wiring and all that don't bother me since I do that all the time.
There is the ongoing maintenance part too, not just the initial effort.
If you keep the changes to yourself, you have to re-incorporate them into OnStep with every new
version that you download. Not a huge effort, but something to be aware of.
If you decide to share your modifications, then they will be in future versions, but you are expected
to give support for others who use the board you created.

I saw the OnStep HAL and see what your going for. I was looking into the datasheets to see how much of a difference it would be.
I would imagine that it would only be the timer numbers, and the maximum pulsing rate (in microseconds) that the MCU can do.

If you go this snapshot of repository, you will see that each HAL file is basically a bunch of defines,
and the common code is in shared header files.
Do a diff from that snapshot on the STM32F411.h and STM32F446.h to see what I mean.
What is in the repo now is not the same as that snapshot, because Howard prefers monolithic files.

Once you figure out these values, it would be another STM32F407.h file with timers and max rate.
More work is the pinmap: getting everything tested (and there are lots of variations, SPI drivers vs. regular ones, focusers, LED, reticle, and so on ...)