ONSTEP EQ5 GOTO #EQ5 #wemos #esp32 #cnc #wifi


oddvarness@...
 

First of all a BIG THANK YOU to the creator and everyone that has contributed to OnStep and making it possible for a layman to make a very good, intuitive, portable and robust celestial tracking and goto system.

 

TL;DR

 

I just completed my build from an old EQ5 with a Wemos R32 and a Arduino CNC V3 shield. After a long night a couple weeks ago I could finally confirm it worked and tracked with satisfactory results. Thanks to all the helpful information found within this group and through the wiki, the journey from start to end went quite well with only small hiccups on the way (mainly due to my inexperience with both microcontrollers and astronomy). 

 

  • Mount: Old EQ5 (bought second hand)

  • Controller Board: Wemos R32 w/Arduino CNC V3 Shield and LV8729 drivers

  • Motors: 400step Nema17 0.9deg 1.9A

  • RA Gear: 16t (GT2 6.35mm bore)+ 48t (GT2 5mm bore) and 150 6mm GT2 belt

  • DEC Gear: 12t (GT2 6.35mm bore) + 48t (GT2 5mm bore) and 140 6mm GT2 belt

  • Extra features:

 

3D PRINTED PARTS:

 

 

 

 

M81 and M82 - Unguided 30 subs @ 60sec ISO 800 - plus 10 bias and 10 Darks - Fully stacked and processed in Affinity Photo

 


THE LONGER STORY

 

In case it might help other beginners to succeed I've tried to document the parts I used and my specific configurations. Please keep in mind that this is done with my best intentions, but remember that I am also just an amateur - most of what takes place within this controller is like magic to me so I would strongly recommend that you do your own research and read the Wiki thoroughly.

 

My main goal has been to make a semi-automated battery powered remote controlled go-to mount for astrophotography.

 

ITEMS:

  • Mount: Old EQ5 (bought second hand)
  • Controller Board: Wemos R32 w/Arduino CNC V3 Shield: (Link and (Link)
  • Drivers: LV8729 (Link)
  • Motors: 400step Nema17 0.9deg 1.9A (cheap Chinese version)
  • RA Gear: 16t (GT2 6.35mm bore)+ 48t (GT2 5mm bore) and 150 6mm GT2 belt
  • DEC Gear: 12t (GT2 6.35mm bore) + 48t (GT2 5mm bore) and 140 6mm GT2 belt
  • Connections: RJ45 breakout boards (Link)
  • Extra features:
  • Wifi (ESP8266 NodeMCU DevBoard)

  • DS3231 RTC (Real Time Clock)

  • Prepared for Motorized focuser (not tested)

  • Prepared for ST4 guiding input (not tested - Link)

 

3D PRINTED PARTS:

 

STEPS:

Electrical:

  1. Firstly, the Wiki instructions for electrical connections are excellent so make sure to read that part and connect everything together accordingly (Link

  2. Also make sure to adjust the drivers correctly with regards to the motors - I adjusted vRef to 1.1V (Link

  3. LV8729 drivers can be configured for 32 microsteps by inserting 2 jumpers on the CNC shield in slot M1 and M3 for each driver slot (leave the middle jumper slot empty - Link).

Software Configurations:

  1. Follow this instructions carefully for setting up Arduino IDE correctly for flashing both the Wemos R32 and the ESP8266 (Link and Link)

  2. Download OnStep V4.x Master File and extract to default Arduino sketch folder (Direct Download Link)

  3. Download and populate the Configuration Calculation sheet with correct values (Direct Download Link

  4. Web configuration for config.h (Link)

    1. 4.x Masterfile selected

    2. Equatorial mount selected

    3. Desired Slewing Speed = 3

    4. Select 400step 0.9deg motor for both axis

    5. Select 32 micro steps

    6. Axis 1 Gear Ratio 1 with my setup = 3 (48/16)

    7. Axis 1 Gear Ratio 2 for EQ5 = 144 (EQ5 internal worm gear)

    8. Axis 2 Gear Ratio 1 with my setup = 3 (48/12)

    9. Axis 2 Gear Ratio 2 for EQ5 = 144 (EQ5 internal worm gear)

    10. DS3231 I2C RTC enabled

    11. ST4 Port for guiding enabled

    12. All else is left at default or “NO”

    13. Generate the “Config.h” file and replace the Config.h file in the folder from step 3.

  5. Flashing the Wemos R32 with Arduino IDE:

    1. Connect the Wemos to the computer and start Arduino IDE

    2. Open the onstep.ino file in the folder from step 3.

    3. Identify correct board type and com port

    4. Select “Upload” to start the flashing process

    5. When flashing is done disconnect the Wemos R32

  6. Flashing the ESP8266 Wifi Module with Arduino IDE:

    1. Connect the ESP8266 to the computer and start Arduino IDE

    2. Open the wifi.ino file in the folder from step 3.

    3. Identify correct board type and com port

    4. Select “Upload” to start the flashing process

    5. When flashing is done disconnect the ESP8266

  7. Reconnect everything, apply power and verify full functionality by downloading the corresponding Android App or any of the other possibilities (Link).


Additional items complimenting my setup, but not related to OnStep directly:

 

Telescope and camera:

  • Main Telescope: SharpStar 61EDPH (Mk1) w/flattener

  • Finder scope: Sky-Watcher EvoGuide 50ED (soon to be guide scope)

  • Camera: Nikon D3300 and Nikon D750

 

Thanks to all this I now have a low budget, wireless, highly accurate tracker and GoTo system. Still have a lot left to learn though :)


Chad Gray
 

Awesome Looking build!!


On Sun, May 9, 2021 at 4:42 PM <oddvarness@...> wrote:

First of all a BIG THANK YOU to the creator and everyone that has contributed to OnStep and making it possible for a layman to make a very good, intuitive, portable and robust celestial tracking and goto system.

 

TL;DR

 

I just completed my build from an old EQ5 with a Wemos R32 and a Arduino CNC V3 shield. After a long night a couple weeks ago I could finally confirm it worked and tracked with satisfactory results. Thanks to all the helpful information found within this group and through the wiki, the journey from start to end went quite well with only small hiccups on the way (mainly due to my inexperience with both microcontrollers and astronomy). 

 

  • Mount: Old EQ5 (bought second hand)

  • Controller Board: Wemos R32 w/Arduino CNC V3 Shield and LV8729 drivers

  • Motors: 400step Nema17 0.9deg 1.9A

  • RA Gear: 16t (GT2 6.35mm bore)+ 48t (GT2 5mm bore) and 150 6mm GT2 belt

  • DEC Gear: 12t (GT2 6.35mm bore) + 48t (GT2 5mm bore) and 140 6mm GT2 belt

  • Extra features:

 

3D PRINTED PARTS:

 

 

 

 

M81 and M82 - Unguided 30 subs @ 60sec ISO 800 - plus 10 bias and 10 Darks - Fully stacked and processed in Affinity Photo

 


THE LONGER STORY

 

In case it might help other beginners to succeed I've tried to document the parts I used and my specific configurations. Please keep in mind that this is done with my best intentions, but remember that I am also just an amateur - most of what takes place within this controller is like magic to me so I would strongly recommend that you do your own research and read the Wiki thoroughly.

 

My main goal has been to make a semi-automated battery powered remote controlled go-to mount for astrophotography.

 

ITEMS:

  • Mount: Old EQ5 (bought second hand)
  • Controller Board: Wemos R32 w/Arduino CNC V3 Shield: (Link and (Link)
  • Drivers: LV8729 (Link)
  • Motors: 400step Nema17 0.9deg 1.9A (cheap Chinese version)
  • RA Gear: 16t (GT2 6.35mm bore)+ 48t (GT2 5mm bore) and 150 6mm GT2 belt
  • DEC Gear: 12t (GT2 6.35mm bore) + 48t (GT2 5mm bore) and 140 6mm GT2 belt
  • Connections: RJ45 breakout boards (Link)
  • Extra features:
  • Wifi (ESP8266 NodeMCU DevBoard)

  • DS3231 RTC (Real Time Clock)

  • Prepared for Motorized focuser (not tested)

  • Prepared for ST4 guiding input (not tested - Link)

 

3D PRINTED PARTS:

 

STEPS:

Electrical:

  1. Firstly, the Wiki instructions for electrical connections are excellent so make sure to read that part and connect everything together accordingly (Link

  2. Also make sure to adjust the drivers correctly with regards to the motors - I adjusted vRef to 1.1V (Link

  3. LV8729 drivers can be configured for 32 microsteps by inserting 2 jumpers on the CNC shield in slot M1 and M3 for each driver slot (leave the middle jumper slot empty - Link).

Software Configurations:

  1. Follow this instructions carefully for setting up Arduino IDE correctly for flashing both the Wemos R32 and the ESP8266 (Link and Link)

  2. Download OnStep V4.x Master File and extract to default Arduino sketch folder (Direct Download Link)

  3. Download and populate the Configuration Calculation sheet with correct values (Direct Download Link

  4. Web configuration for config.h (Link)

    1. 4.x Masterfile selected

    2. Equatorial mount selected

    3. Desired Slewing Speed = 3

    4. Select 400step 0.9deg motor for both axis

    5. Select 32 micro steps

    6. Axis 1 Gear Ratio 1 with my setup = 3 (48/16)

    7. Axis 1 Gear Ratio 2 for EQ5 = 144 (EQ5 internal worm gear)

    8. Axis 2 Gear Ratio 1 with my setup = 3 (48/12)

    9. Axis 2 Gear Ratio 2 for EQ5 = 144 (EQ5 internal worm gear)

    10. DS3231 I2C RTC enabled

    11. ST4 Port for guiding enabled

    12. All else is left at default or “NO”

    13. Generate the “Config.h” file and replace the Config.h file in the folder from step 3.

  5. Flashing the Wemos R32 with Arduino IDE:

    1. Connect the Wemos to the computer and start Arduino IDE

    2. Open the onstep.ino file in the folder from step 3.

    3. Identify correct board type and com port

    4. Select “Upload” to start the flashing process

    5. When flashing is done disconnect the Wemos R32

  6. Flashing the ESP8266 Wifi Module with Arduino IDE:

    1. Connect the ESP8266 to the computer and start Arduino IDE

    2. Open the wifi.ino file in the folder from step 3.

    3. Identify correct board type and com port

    4. Select “Upload” to start the flashing process

    5. When flashing is done disconnect the ESP8266

  7. Reconnect everything, apply power and verify full functionality by downloading the corresponding Android App or any of the other possibilities (Link).


Additional items complimenting my setup, but not related to OnStep directly:

 

Telescope and camera:

  • Main Telescope: SharpStar 61EDPH (Mk1) w/flattener

  • Finder scope: Sky-Watcher EvoGuide 50ED (soon to be guide scope)

  • Camera: Nikon D3300 and Nikon D750

 

Thanks to all this I now have a low budget, wireless, highly accurate tracker and GoTo system. Still have a lot left to learn though :)


Khalid Baheyeldin
 

Thanks for sharing. It is now in the showcase.

If you can find the time to write a detailed document that is saved in PDF format, it can be a user guide that is added to the Wiki under Files -> Documents.


astrosathya
 

Hey,
Thanks for sharing this and just in time for me to use it. The parts for my CNC V3+ Wemos R32 D1 and other bits are on the way. My mount is a now dead HEQ5-PRO (the motherboard died two weeks ago).
I also have the Astroberry on Pi4 and planning to do exactly what you did. I'll obviously pester you a bit when I need help.😀.
Extremely well written document. Thanks again.

On Mon, 10 May, 2021, 2:12 am , <oddvarness@...> wrote:

First of all a BIG THANK YOU to the creator and everyone that has contributed to OnStep and making it possible for a layman to make a very good, intuitive, portable and robust celestial tracking and goto system.

 

TL;DR

 

I just completed my build from an old EQ5 with a Wemos R32 and a Arduino CNC V3 shield. After a long night a couple weeks ago I could finally confirm it worked and tracked with satisfactory results. Thanks to all the helpful information found within this group and through the wiki, the journey from start to end went quite well with only small hiccups on the way (mainly due to my inexperience with both microcontrollers and astronomy). 

 

  • Mount: Old EQ5 (bought second hand)

  • Controller Board: Wemos R32 w/Arduino CNC V3 Shield and LV8729 drivers

  • Motors: 400step Nema17 0.9deg 1.9A

  • RA Gear: 16t (GT2 6.35mm bore)+ 48t (GT2 5mm bore) and 150 6mm GT2 belt

  • DEC Gear: 12t (GT2 6.35mm bore) + 48t (GT2 5mm bore) and 140 6mm GT2 belt

  • Extra features:

 

3D PRINTED PARTS:

 

 

 

 

M81 and M82 - Unguided 30 subs @ 60sec ISO 800 - plus 10 bias and 10 Darks - Fully stacked and processed in Affinity Photo

 


THE LONGER STORY

 

In case it might help other beginners to succeed I've tried to document the parts I used and my specific configurations. Please keep in mind that this is done with my best intentions, but remember that I am also just an amateur - most of what takes place within this controller is like magic to me so I would strongly recommend that you do your own research and read the Wiki thoroughly.

 

My main goal has been to make a semi-automated battery powered remote controlled go-to mount for astrophotography.

 

ITEMS:

  • Mount: Old EQ5 (bought second hand)
  • Controller Board: Wemos R32 w/Arduino CNC V3 Shield: (Link and (Link)
  • Drivers: LV8729 (Link)
  • Motors: 400step Nema17 0.9deg 1.9A (cheap Chinese version)
  • RA Gear: 16t (GT2 6.35mm bore)+ 48t (GT2 5mm bore) and 150 6mm GT2 belt
  • DEC Gear: 12t (GT2 6.35mm bore) + 48t (GT2 5mm bore) and 140 6mm GT2 belt
  • Connections: RJ45 breakout boards (Link)
  • Extra features:
  • Wifi (ESP8266 NodeMCU DevBoard)

  • DS3231 RTC (Real Time Clock)

  • Prepared for Motorized focuser (not tested)

  • Prepared for ST4 guiding input (not tested - Link)

 

3D PRINTED PARTS:

 

STEPS:

Electrical:

  1. Firstly, the Wiki instructions for electrical connections are excellent so make sure to read that part and connect everything together accordingly (Link

  2. Also make sure to adjust the drivers correctly with regards to the motors - I adjusted vRef to 1.1V (Link

  3. LV8729 drivers can be configured for 32 microsteps by inserting 2 jumpers on the CNC shield in slot M1 and M3 for each driver slot (leave the middle jumper slot empty - Link).

Software Configurations:

  1. Follow this instructions carefully for setting up Arduino IDE correctly for flashing both the Wemos R32 and the ESP8266 (Link and Link)

  2. Download OnStep V4.x Master File and extract to default Arduino sketch folder (Direct Download Link)

  3. Download and populate the Configuration Calculation sheet with correct values (Direct Download Link

  4. Web configuration for config.h (Link)

    1. 4.x Masterfile selected

    2. Equatorial mount selected

    3. Desired Slewing Speed = 3

    4. Select 400step 0.9deg motor for both axis

    5. Select 32 micro steps

    6. Axis 1 Gear Ratio 1 with my setup = 3 (48/16)

    7. Axis 1 Gear Ratio 2 for EQ5 = 144 (EQ5 internal worm gear)

    8. Axis 2 Gear Ratio 1 with my setup = 3 (48/12)

    9. Axis 2 Gear Ratio 2 for EQ5 = 144 (EQ5 internal worm gear)

    10. DS3231 I2C RTC enabled

    11. ST4 Port for guiding enabled

    12. All else is left at default or “NO”

    13. Generate the “Config.h” file and replace the Config.h file in the folder from step 3.

  5. Flashing the Wemos R32 with Arduino IDE:

    1. Connect the Wemos to the computer and start Arduino IDE

    2. Open the onstep.ino file in the folder from step 3.

    3. Identify correct board type and com port

    4. Select “Upload” to start the flashing process

    5. When flashing is done disconnect the Wemos R32

  6. Flashing the ESP8266 Wifi Module with Arduino IDE:

    1. Connect the ESP8266 to the computer and start Arduino IDE

    2. Open the wifi.ino file in the folder from step 3.

    3. Identify correct board type and com port

    4. Select “Upload” to start the flashing process

    5. When flashing is done disconnect the ESP8266

  7. Reconnect everything, apply power and verify full functionality by downloading the corresponding Android App or any of the other possibilities (Link).


Additional items complimenting my setup, but not related to OnStep directly:

 

Telescope and camera:

  • Main Telescope: SharpStar 61EDPH (Mk1) w/flattener

  • Finder scope: Sky-Watcher EvoGuide 50ED (soon to be guide scope)

  • Camera: Nikon D3300 and Nikon D750

 

Thanks to all this I now have a low budget, wireless, highly accurate tracker and GoTo system. Still have a lot left to learn though :)


Ken Hunter
 

Very well done, Congrats...

One question about the ratios

Axis 1 Gear Ratio 1 with my setup = 3 (48/16)

Axis 1 Gear Ratio 2 for EQ5 = 144 (EQ5 internal worm gear)
Axis 2 Gear Ratio 1 with my setup = 3 (48/12)
Axis 2 Gear Ratio 2 for EQ5 = 144 (EQ5 internal worm gear)

48/16 = 3
48/12 = 4

Ken


oddvarness@...
 

Thanks,

I'm actually already working on a document including a simplified connection diagram for my own reference, but when its done I'll make a PDF of it and upload it.


oddvarness@...
 

48/16 = 3
48/12 = 4
You're correct. Typo in the instructions, it should be gear ratio 3 and 4. I have not found a way to edit earlier post. I'll catch this in the PDF.


oddvarness@...
 

I did not manage to upload files to the files->document section so I'll just add the build instructions to this post. This should be better than my first post here.


Khalid Baheyeldin
 

On Wed, May 12, 2021 at 05:15 PM, <oddvarness@...> wrote:
I did not manage to upload files to the files->document section so I'll just add the build instructions to this post. This should be better than my first post here.
Thanks for doing this. I uploaded it here, with a more descriptive name.

https://onstep.groups.io/g/main/files/Documents%20and%20Guides


astrosathya
 

brilliantly formatted instruction. However, while reading it I saw that he mentions about using jumpers for M0, M1 M2 near the driver boards. I am not really sure if i need to do it for 1/64 microsteps. Also, i would like to add ST4 and I have no idea how to add the resistors etc. If someone could please explain in laymans terms, preferably with some diagram/photo, I'd be grateful.


oddvarness@...
 

On Fri, May 14, 2021 at 11:24 AM, astrosathya wrote:
brilliantly formatted instruction. However, while reading it I saw that he mentions about using jumpers for M0, M1 M2 near the driver boards. I am not really sure if i need to do it for 1/64 microsteps. Also, i would like to add ST4 and I have no idea how to add the resistors etc. If someone could please explain in laymans terms, preferably with some diagram/photo, I'd be grateful.
For 64 microsteps with LV8729 you should use jumpers on M1 and M2 and leave M0 "open/empty" (https://wiki.fysetc.com/LV8729_V1.0/9). Regarding the ST4 port I just put regular resistors into a female dupont cable and put heat shrink tubes over them. The other end of the resistor I terminated directly to the screw terminals on the RJ11/12 breakout board I used. Probably not the most robust or elegant solution, but it works (I think at least).


astrosathya
 

I have purchased short header caps to high the M1 and M2 pins. I also notice that you've basically used breakout boards for all the RJ sockets stuck with hot glue? With repeated  attachment and removal of the cables, will the glue hold?


oddvarness@...
 

On Sat, May 15, 2021 at 01:37 PM, astrosathya wrote:
I have purchased short header caps to high the M1 and M2 pins. I also notice that you've basically used breakout boards for all the RJ sockets stuck with hot glue? With repeated  attachment and removal of the cables, will the glue hold?
Well, if all parts holds through extensive use remains to be found out. I just about completed the build at the end of the season here in Norway so I've only been running it all for 4 or 5 nights. However, everything seems very well secure including the power plug that takes some force to plug/unplug. If something loosen it should be easy enough to glue it back on. However, using ie epoxy instead of hot glue would probably been even better, but would aslo be significantly worse to remove if you would want to make any changes to things later on.


astrosathya
 

I am not sure Epoxy would work. The reason is that on my HEQ5-PRO, the power board had come loose because of a missing screw and when i used Epoxy to glue it back on, it wouldn't stick to the plastic casing fo the power board, which I felt was quite weird. Anyway, good luck with the use of your build.
By the way, I am curious to know why you did not stack up the Wemos R32 and CNCv3 please.


oddvarness@...
 

On Sat, May 15, 2021 at 04:07 PM, astrosathya wrote:
By the way, I am curious to know why you did not stack up the Wemos R32 and CNCv3 please.
They are stacked up. The Wemos R32 is below the CNC shield on the posted picture. Next to those are the DS3231 stacked on top of the ESP8266 board and then there's the RJ11/12 Breakout board.


astrosathya
 

oops, I failed to notice that. Ok, you're using 8266 for Wifi. Alright, I will not be using either ST4 nor Wifi. I'll use usb cable for Astroberry. 
Cheers, great job.
:)


oddvarness@...
 

@astrosathya / All, 

You probably already know this, but please note that the ST4 connections I've done is wrong. Please see the updated page on the Wiki. I need to re-do my ST4 connections accordingly! 


John Petterson
 

I ma curious as to why you used the 12t gear on the DEC axis and 16t on the RA.  Wouldn't 12t provide better resolution and therefore more accurate tracking?  And wouldn't you want that on the RA axis?


oddvarness@...
 

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 07:22 PM, John Petterson wrote:
I ma curious as to why you used the 12t gear on the DEC axis and 16t on the RA.  Wouldn't 12t provide better resolution and therefore more accurate tracking?  And wouldn't you want that on the RA axis?
You are absolutely correct, I was planning to use 12t on both axis, but in order to get the right tension on the timing belt I had to swap with a 16t on the RA axis. I might order a shorter belt later and swap back to 12t. However, it seems to track just fine with my relatively modest setup for now (61EDPH@275mm).


estructurasmarorte@...
 

Hola, muy bien, estoy construyendo el Wemos R32 y un escudo Arduino CNC V3. Y lo que no me queda claro es qué se indica en la foto, y dónde están conectados estos seis cables. Saludos y disculpe el ingles pero lo traduzco por Google