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RTC BluePill issue


 

Hi
I seem to have an issue with the RTC time/date.  I set the time/date in the SHC hand controller.  Then I power off.  When I restart the system later, the initial time/date I get is the same as when I powered off.  Isn't the RTC supposed to maintain the current time, even when the system is powered off?  I checked the coin battery and it is good.  

If it is a case of a bad RTC unit and I replace it, will I have to reflash the firmware?  (No big deal--just curious)

This is not an issue if the system is connected to my computer via POTH, as POTH is set to update OnStep's time to the computer's.  
I am using firmware ver. 3.15e and SHC ver 1.5c


tnut55
 

I have seen the same thing with my BP as well.  Have not paid much attention, too many other things to do first.


On Tue, Feb 11, 2020 at 1:47 PM, Richard Shagam
<rnshagam@...> wrote:
Hi
I seem to have an issue with the RTC time/date.  I set the time/date in the SHC hand controller.  Then I power off.  When I restart the system later, the initial time/date I get is the same as when I powered off.  Isn't the RTC supposed to maintain the current time, even when the system is powered off?  I checked the coin battery and it is good.  

If it is a case of a bad RTC unit and I replace it, will I have to reflash the firmware?  (No big deal--just curious)

This is not an issue if the system is connected to my computer via POTH, as POTH is set to update OnStep's time to the computer's.  
I am using firmware ver. 3.15e and SHC ver 1.5c


Khalid Baheyeldin
 

On Tue, Feb 11, 2020 at 02:47 PM, Richard Shagam wrote:
If it is a case of a bad RTC unit and I replace it, will I have to reflash the firmware?  (No big deal--just curious)
No. You don't need to reflash anything if you replace anything (other than the STM32 itself).

Can you run the I2C scanner just to verify that the RTC is accessible?
Also, on the web page, do you see "PPS"?


 

On Tue, Feb 11, 2020 at 11:55 AM, Khalid Baheyeldin wrote:
Can you run the I2C scanner just to verify that the RTC is accessible?
Also, on the web page, do you see "PPS"?
Can you explain the I2C scanner? and where on the web page?  On the status tab?


Khalid Baheyeldin
 

On Tue, Feb 11, 2020 at 04:39 PM, Richard Shagam wrote:
Can you explain the I2C scanner?
You will find it on the group's Files section, under STM32 utilities.

and where on the web page?  On the status tab?
Yes.
Alternatively, if are familiar with the Arduino IDE, open Serial Monitor,
then enter:

:GU#

A capital S in the result means a Pulse Per Second (PPS) signal is detected from the RTC.


 

Simple solution to my problem:  Turns out I hadn't activated the RTC in config.h  Needed to set option "#define TIME_LOCATION_SOURCE          DS3231 //  "
Works great, now


George Cushing
 

Probably should have intro to the Arduino IDE in early grade school.


 

Probably should have intro to the Arduino IDE in early grade school.
Computer education in grade school for me was watching students at Illinois Institute of Technology demonstrate playing the Star Spangled Banner programmed on punch cards and sound generated from the rf oscillations leaked by computer circuits (tubes?).  Next step was learning BASIC on a TeleType connected via acoustic modem to a UNIVAC 1108.  That's how far back I go.  Arduino is a pretty recent addition to my knowledge base--I do wish it had been around in graduate school--back when the 555 timer chip and Z80 microprocessor were big deals.  (I now can claim I could have done my entire dissertation--experiments, writing and publishing on today's smartphones.)


tnut55
 

There were no Arduinos or even PC's when I was in grade school.  TV's were all vacuum tubes as were radios and I don't think the transistor was invented yet.

But, I got to watch the space race in its entirity, lived in a time when making your own optics was the norm.

And I'll probably die before the terminators rise and kill off all humanity or we all fry due to global warming...lol.


On Tue, Feb 18, 2020 at 9:49 AM, Richard Shagam
<rnshagam@...> wrote:
Probably should have intro to the Arduino IDE in early grade school.
Computer education in grade school for me was watching students at Illinois Institute of Technology demonstrate playing the Star Spangled Banner programmed on punch cards and sound generated from the rf oscillations leaked by computer circuits (tubes?).  Next step was learning BASIC on a TeleType connected via acoustic modem to a UNIVAC 1108.  That's how far back I go.  Arduino is a pretty recent addition to my knowledge base--I do wish it had been around in graduate school--back when the 555 timer chip and Z80 microprocessor were big deals.  (I now can claim I could have done my entire dissertation--experiments, writing and publishing on today's smartphones.)


George Cushing
 

Pretty old history. From the Wikipedia: Austro-Hungarian physicist Julius Edgar Lilienfeld proposed the concept of a field-effect transistor in 1926, but it was not possible to actually construct a working device at that time. Researchers at Bell LabsWestern ElectricMITPurdue and in the UK intensively developed point-contact diodes (crystal rectifiers or crystal diodes) during World War II for application in radar. From this work the first working point-contact transistor device was built was in 1947 by American physicists John Bardeen and Walter Brattain while working under William Shockley at Bell Labs.

The most widely used transistor is the MOSFET (metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor), also known as the MOS transistor, which was invented by Egyptian engineer Mohamed Atalla with Korean engineer Dawon Kahng at Bell Labs in 1959. The MOSFET was the first truly compact transistor that could be miniaturized and mass-produced for a wide range of uses. Of course, MOSFETs are at the heart of our stepper drivers.

The 64K GE mainframe at college had core memory. The first time I saw a 8GB micro SD card I ran the numbers on the assumption that a inch square piece of core got you a byte. That's 55.6 million square feet or 2 square miles of core memory.



George Cushing
 

RTC built using logic ICs.