Smart Hand Controller power


Chad Gray
 

Well after getting the simple hand controller working i was hoping the Smart hand controller would go smoother.

It did not.  I plug it into my Wemos/CNC setup like i did for the simple HC and the ESP32 LED does not turn on.

I added headers to the PCB so i can pull the ESP32 off and i plugged it into USB and the LED powers on.  I was also able to flash it again.

I measured my voltage to the Smart Hand Controller and it is 5.3volts.  Any ideas why the ESP32 will not power on when plugged into the PCB?

I did measure the voltage at the capacitor and it was 2.6volts.  I thought that was kind of odd.

Chad


Dave Schwartz
 

If that 2.6 volts at the capacitor is the same as what gets to the ESP32 then that would be a problem. That's definitely less than the voltage that the ESP32 module's own 5-to3.3V regulator will require to turn on. If you have 5V on pin 2 of the RJ45 (or pin 2 of the pads for the 6-pin Molex) but its down to 2.6 by the time it gets to the capacitor then you've either got a bad solder joint or a short somewhere. The power LED on the ESP32S board is actually before the 3.3V regulator so if that doesn't come on it means the power being fed on the 5V input is even too low to light the LED.

On 2021-04-29 2:26 p.m., Chad Gray wrote:
Well after getting the simple hand controller working i was hoping the Smart hand controller would go smoother.

It did not.  I plug it into my Wemos/CNC setup like i did for the simple HC and the ESP32 LED does not turn on.

I added headers to the PCB so i can pull the ESP32 off and i plugged it into USB and the LED powers on.  I was also able to flash it again.

I measured my voltage to the Smart Hand Controller and it is 5.3volts.  Any ideas why the ESP32 will not power on when plugged into the PCB?

I did measure the voltage at the capacitor and it was 2.6volts.  I thought that was kind of odd.

Chad


Chad Gray
 

OK i think it is my RJ11 connector that is the problem.  I have 3 more boards left so i am going to start over and go slow adding parts measuring voltage and continuity as i go.

I just have to wait on more RJ11 connectors that was my last one.

Thanks!
Chad


On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 3:56 PM Dave Schwartz <Dave.Schwartz@...> wrote:
If that 2.6 volts at the capacitor is the same as what gets to the ESP32
then that would be a problem. That's definitely less than the voltage
that the ESP32 module's own 5-to3.3V regulator will require to turn on.
If you have 5V on pin 2 of the RJ45 (or pin 2 of the pads for the 6-pin
Molex) but its down to 2.6 by the time it gets to the capacitor then
you've either got a bad solder joint or a short somewhere. The power LED
on the ESP32S board is actually before the 3.3V regulator so if that
doesn't come on it means the power being fed on the 5V input is even too
low to light the LED.

On 2021-04-29 2:26 p.m., Chad Gray wrote:
> Well after getting the simple hand controller working i was hoping the
> Smart hand controller would go smoother.
>
> It did not.  I plug it into my Wemos/CNC setup like i did for the
> simple HC and the ESP32 LED does not turn on.
>
> I added headers to the PCB so i can pull the ESP32 off and i plugged
> it into USB and the LED powers on.  I was also able to flash it again.
>
> I measured my voltage to the Smart Hand Controller and it is
> 5.3volts.  Any ideas why the ESP32 will not power on when plugged into
> the PCB?
>
> I did measure the voltage at the capacitor and it was 2.6volts.  I
> thought that was kind of odd.
>
> Chad
>






Dave Schwartz
 

Could be. I've seen the wires get crossed-up internally. Usually you can see that problem by looking in the socket and checking if the wires need realignment.

I've also heard of pins not being carefully inserted into the pads so when it is snapped down one of the pins got bent over which, if it were to bend just the wrong way, could cause a short.

On 2021-04-29 4:15 p.m., Chad Gray wrote:
OK i think it is my RJ11 connector that is the problem.  I have 3 more boards left so i am going to start over and go slow adding parts measuring voltage and continuity as i go.

I just have to wait on more RJ11 connectors that was my last one.

Thanks!
Chad


On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 3:56 PM Dave Schwartz <Dave.Schwartz@netflash.net <mailto:Dave.Schwartz@netflash.net>> wrote:

If that 2.6 volts at the capacitor is the same as what gets to the
ESP32
then that would be a problem. That's definitely less than the voltage
that the ESP32 module's own 5-to3.3V regulator will require to
turn on.
If you have 5V on pin 2 of the RJ45 (or pin 2 of the pads for the
6-pin
Molex) but its down to 2.6 by the time it gets to the capacitor then
you've either got a bad solder joint or a short somewhere. The
power LED
on the ESP32S board is actually before the 3.3V regulator so if that
doesn't come on it means the power being fed on the 5V input is
even too
low to light the LED.

On 2021-04-29 2:26 p.m., Chad Gray wrote:
> Well after getting the simple hand controller working i was
hoping the
> Smart hand controller would go smoother.
>
> It did not.  I plug it into my Wemos/CNC setup like i did for the
> simple HC and the ESP32 LED does not turn on.
>
> I added headers to the PCB so i can pull the ESP32 off and i
plugged
> it into USB and the LED powers on.  I was also able to flash it
again.
>
> I measured my voltage to the Smart Hand Controller and it is
> 5.3volts.  Any ideas why the ESP32 will not power on when
plugged into
> the PCB?
>
> I did measure the voltage at the capacitor and it was 2.6volts.  I
> thought that was kind of odd.
>
> Chad
>






George Cushing
 

Something's pulling current somewhere. Are your OLED Jumpers set correctly?

SHC Pwr.jpg


Drew 🔭📷🚴‍♂️
 

On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 04:26 PM, George Cushing wrote:
Are your OLED Jumpers set correctly?
 
Danger Will Robinson! I made that mistake and smoked an OLED. They can't take more than a second (if that) of the wrong power jumpers set.


Chad Gray
 

Thanks guys!  My OLED jumpers are right.  Ground is the first pin and vcc is the second.

I think it is my RJ11 jack.  I am getting some great soldering practice!

Chad

On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 4:36 PM Drew 🔭📷🚴‍♂️ <drewbolce@...> wrote:
On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 04:26 PM, George Cushing wrote:
Are your OLED Jumpers set correctly?
 
Danger Will Robinson! I made that mistake and smoked an OLED. They can't take more than a second (if that) of the wrong power jumpers set.


John Petterson
 

The only problem with having more practice is the cost of the practice parts....

FYI, officially those are RJ12 jacks because they carry 6 wires.  RJ11 only use 2 or 4 wires even though they are the same size with 6 slots.  I know, it is  confusing but that was the telephone company.....


George Cushing
 

I never make mistakes, so I don't know how I developed this technique.   For the RJs cut the pins here.  

image.png

Then pull the plastic away. Taking one pin at a time straighten it out. With the solder side up clip something with a bit of weight on the pin. I use some forceps or a small set of vise grips. Now get a ball of solder on your iron and apply it to the solder end of the pin and let gravity do the work. My iron is usually about 325C and unless you are using lead free solder, that should be enough to let it fall out. Don't press the iron against the pin too hard as it can prevent it from dropping.

Now you'll have to clear the through holes. I've got desoldering wick and a special iron, but don't bother with that. I mostly use a 3mm wide chisel tip. Again with a little wet solder on the tip I lay the flat against the through hole to melt its solder and then quickly whack the board against the bench top. If the hole isn't freed enough, there is usually a dimple opposite the iron side. I have a dedicated Harbor Freight rotary tool that has a 0.025" drill bit to clear the pads. Did I say I run into this a lot? The dimple makes for accurate enough drilling. I get these bits from a shop that caters to the electric train hobby.


George Cushing
 

The federal telecommunications law requires that all modular connectors intended to be connected to the telephone system are to be registered with and approved by the FCC. Such connectors are called Registered Jacks (RJs). 
 
The main approved modular telephony jacks are the RJ-11, 14, 25, which have 6 positions and up to 6 conductors. These are intended to connect 1, 2 or 3 phones to the system. The RJ-11 is 6P2C, RJ-14 is 6P4C and the RJ-25 is 6P6C. There is also a RJ-61 for 4 lines. It is an 8P8C. The 8-pin modular jack is sometimes referred to as an "RJ-45", because the connector/jack components are the same. However, RJ-45[S] actually applied to a special telephony jack configuration that is not used in LAN or standard telephone wiring and is now obsolete. Internet versions of the RJ-61, i.e. the RJ-45, are not FCC recognized RJs. They are regulated under ANSI rules.
 
What about these?
 
 
Sorry, there are no 4P4C or 4P2C RJs. No RJ-9s, 10s, 22s, etc. The 4P4C was designed by the Bell system as a handset cable connector. As such it was not intended to be connected to the telephone system and thus did not require FCC registration. This is one reason they come in various widths and drive us nuts. Yes, they are the outlaw jack.


John Petterson
 

On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 09:11 AM, George Cushing wrote:
Now you'll have to clear the through holes.

If you do it a lot, this hot air device on one side and the solder sucker (the thing in this kit on the far left of the picture) applied to the other side of the board will clear the holes without having to bang the board on the table or have molten solder balls flying around.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07T9KLHY5/


John Petterson
 

On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 04:31 PM, John Petterson wrote:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07T9KLHY5/
And by the way - with practice, this will heat all 6 or 8 of the soldered wires on the RJ connector and allow you to take it off in one piece, potentially able to reuse it.  I have removed devices up to a Teensy using it without damage (although the circuit board it was soldered to turned a darker color in that area.  Perhaps if I had more patience and used a lower temperature and more time....)


George Cushing
 

I find it difficult to heat all the pins evenly enough to guarantee that one of the vias won't be damaged. Certainly not worth the 10-14 cents I pay for a connector.


John Petterson
 

On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 12:48 PM, George Cushing wrote:
The main approved modular telephony jacks are the RJ-11, 14, 25, which have 6 positions and up to 6 conductors.

There is a pretty good discussion of this on the Wikipedia page including the chart below (which is much longer in the article - this portion has the lines I was intrested in.)

There are at least 3 different standards established for the same 6P6C physical connection - RJ12, RJ18, and RJ25.

And for those of you too young to remember it, there was an official 4 prong 4 wire plug that the US telephone company used before the Registered Jack 11 superseded it.  It had 4 prongs arranged in a trapezoid with the spacing offset to prevent it from being inserted into the socket wrong.  It was much bigger and had to be wired on site so it took longer for installations.  Some older homes may still have these in fastened to the wall above the baseboard around the house....